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      Issue 67 | June 2021

      Featuring essays on Kunwar Narain, Cynthia Ozick, and Robert Lowell as well as a conversation with Rone Shavers and Terese Svoboda

      Conversations: Rone Shavers and Terese Svoboda

      “The very idea of a container makes me itch to deconstruct it.”

      The Lure of Antiquities

      To think about antiquity is to think about time. It is an inevitable process. Ask yourself: what other way is there to describe how objects wear their histories? How else…

      On Kunwar Narain, “the Buddha of contemporary poetry”

      Regardless of the genre of writing, the discourses and theories about translation hardly offer any help to the readers. The fundamental purpose of translating a work is to secure a…

      “They Tell Me Nothing’s Gone”: On Robert Lowell, Life Studies, and Recovery

      By the time Robert Lowell started writing most of the poems in Life Studies, he had been hospitalized five times, mostly for acute mania, and all since the completion of…

      Conversations: Adam Kirsch and Aviya Kushner

      I think that belief in the eternal—in texts that will last—is something that can be felt across Jewish literature.

      Virginia Woolf for FCC Chair!

      Woolf’s critique of media concentration, slyly embedded in Three Guineas (1938) is highly relevant today.

      Conversations: Loie Rawding and Lauren Connell Johnson

      For me, the environments that contain our bodies dictate, to a certain degree, what we are capable of.

      Stones of Witness: On Carolyn Forché’s In the Lateness of the World

      Poetry has the power to create a sense of clarity that is difficult, if not impossible, to replicate in rhetoric.

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